Bella Thorne can often be seen taking fashion risks, and her latest look in Los Angeles Friday night was no different.

The actress was spotted leaving Craig’s, a celebrity-favorite restaurant, sporting a colorful and unique ensemble.

Bella Thorne, Craigs, Blue Shoes, Sweater Dress, Los Angeles

Bella Thorne leaving Craig’s in Los Angeles on Friday.

CREDIT: Shutterstock

The Disney Channel alum fashioned a long sweater into a stylish dress that featured a blue trimmed, v-neck collar that matched the blue stripe on the star’s white sweater. The mini-dress also featured red and black stripes running horizontally down the body and sleeves of the sweater. Thorne kept herself warm by pairing the look with sheer black tights.

Bella Thorne, Craigs, Blue Shoes, Sweater Dress, Los Angeles, Benjamin Mascolo

Details of Bella Thorne’s shoes.

CREDIT: Shutterstock

On her feet, the 22-year-old added another pop of color. She sported a pair of bright-blue, closed-toe pumps that featured a small heel. The actress accessorized her outfit with a long on-trend pearl necklace, as well as two silver choker necklaces.

Bella Thorne, Craigs, Blue Shoes, Sweater Dress, Los Angeles, Benjamin Mascolo

CREDIT: Shutterstock

Thorne was photographed  with her boyfriend, Benjamin Mascolo. The Italian singer contrasted her colorful look with an all-black ensemble. The 26-year-old wore a pair of ripped black skinny jeans along with a t-shirt and silk bomber jacket that featured white trimming on the sleeves. On his feet, he opted for black pull-on boots.

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At the start of a new year, just about everything is surrounded by a feeling of freshness. Everyone has turned over a new leaf, in the hopes that 2020 will be the best, brightest year yet. But even just a few days into January, that shiny optimism and (admittedly naive) belief that everything old has become new again surely starts to wear off as life returns to its usual pace. Well, with some notable exceptions: All the new January 2020 makeup products arriving on shelves.

While you and all your friends have made commitments to constructive habits and healthy self-improvement goals in the new year, all your favorite beauty brands have been gearing up to make 2020 their best turn around the sun, too. And naturally, that means no shortage of fresh, innovative products to revolutionize routines and upgrade beauty lovers’ lives (and makeup shelves). Anything to help you reach your “new year, new you” goals, right?

And January’s new arrivals are a particularly strong showing. There’s something for nearly every type of makeup lover, even those maximalists who are sure they’ve tried everything under the sun. A completely new and unexpected category from fan-fave lip product brand, Bite Beauty, yet another alluring expansion on Charlotte Tilbury’s iconic Pillow Talk range, and Fenty Beauty’s first-ever mascara — they’re all appearing at beauty retailers this month, to help you kick off 2020 on a very glam note.

Chase the appealing aura of a completely clean slate and keep scrolling for all the new makeup products to upgrade your routine, below.

Hourglass’ New Full-Coverage Concealer

Need a heavy-hitting concealer that feels nearly imperceptible on your face? Hourglass’ new launch could be the one for you. It’s a weightless, light-reflecting, full-coverage liquid concealer that’s meant to blur the look of pores and diminish fine lines — resulting in skin that looks airbrushed to perfection. Scoop it up in 22 shades at Sephora starting Jan. 10.

Stila’s High-Shine Liquid Lip Lacquer

Stila’s newest high-shine liquid lip lacquer hit stores (including Ulta) starting Jan. 5, so you can grab all 14 of the intensely pigmented shades during your next shopping trip. The secret to the high-impact color? Ultra-glossy clear lacquer, which combines with the vivid pigments upon application. Argan oil makes the Lip Vinyl super comfortable.

A New Pillow Talk Palette from Charlotte Tilbury

Charlotte Tilbury’s world of Pillow Talk seems to keep expanding — and nobody’s complaining. An all new Instant Eye palette inspired by the now-iconic rosy pink shade launched on the brand’s site Jan. 9, giving fans 12 shades (and 4 easy-to-create looks) at once.

Urban Decay’s Latest Setting Spray

Fans of Urban Decay’s best-selling All Nighter setting spray will be pleased to know it’s got a brand-new sister: Ultra Matte. The superfine mist locks makeup in place for up to 16 hours and provides a shine-free finish. Want a really matte look? Apply before and after makeup application to keep any shine from sneaking past. It’s up for grabs now on the brand’s site.

Anastasia Beverly Hill’s Newest Palette Collab

Amrezy is back for a third collaboration with Anastasia Beverly Hills, with an all-new eyeshadow palette filled with 16 never-before-seen shades that the fan-fave makeup artist herself can’t live without. The palette even includes a totally fresh shadow formula: pressed glitter pigment that delivers maximum shimmer. Shop it starting Jan. 14.

Fenty Beauty’s First Mascara

You’ll be able to shop Fenty Beauty’s first ever mascara on Jan. 16 — and considering its multi-benefit formula is designed to lift, curl, volumize, and lengthen lashes, it sounds like a total must-have. The mascara features a dual-sided brush, that’s full and arched on one side for building major volume, and flat on the other side to define and separate each lash.

Full-Coverage Nude Lipsticks From Kaja

Kaja’s focusing on full, pigmented color payoff in the new year with its latest launch, the Air Heart Lightweight Lipstick. It’s formulated to feel weightless on lips despite the rich, opaque color, and is infused with rose extract for soothing wear. Kaja introduces the lipstick in seven nude hues, in a heart-shaped bullet that’s as helpful as it is cute (use the pointed end to line lips before filling them in). Sephora will stock the lipsticks starting Jan. 24.

NYX Cosmetics’ New $9 Concealer

The latest addition to NYX Cosmetic’s Born To Glow complexion range is a creamy, lightweight concealer that comes in 24 inclusive shades. Thanks to the micropearl-infused formula, it’ll brighten skin as it diminishes the appearance of blemishes and hyperpigmentation — and its puff blender applicator means effortless, mess free application. It’s available now on the brand’s site and retailers like Ulta.

L’Oréal’s First-Ever Matte Lip Crayon

A first for the brand, this matte lip crayon (available in 18 full-coverage, high-impact shades) features long-lasting wear that’s smudge-proof and stays in place. Plus, the crayon application ensures it goes on effortlessly with precision.

Bite Beauty’s Complexion Category Debut

Jan. 10 marks the complexion category debut for Bite Beauty, with the introduction of three products for smooth, even skin. The Changemaker Supercharged Micellar Foundation mimics skins’ natural texture for seamless application and offers medium, long-lasting coverage in 32 creamy shades. It’s available alongside the Changemaker Skin-Optimizing Primer and Changemaker Flexible Coverage Pressed Powder.

A New Blush Range from Kat Von D

Inspired by flowers and a love that never fades, Kat Von D’s new Everlasting blush is designed to deliver pigmented, long-lasting color that promises not to fade. It’s available in six floral shades, from Honeysuckle to Peony to Rosebud, and features a soft matte finish that seamlessly blends with skin. It’s up for grabs beginning Jan. 10 at Kat Von D and Sephora.

Expansions on e.l.f.’s Best-Selling Primer

Drugstore beauty brand e.l.f. calls it’s Poreless Putty Primer the “primer that broke the internet” because it’s almost always sold out. So, the brand did the only sensible thing and expanded on it by introducing two new formulations: Luminous and Matte. Available now, they provide the same makeup gripping, skin-loving hydration and balancing goodness, in new finishes for your ideal look.

Lune + Aster’s Versatile Face & Eye Palette

Want to streamline your daily makeup essentials in one sleek palette? Snag Lune+Aster’s newest launch, which includes wearable nudes for face and eyes in the form of a matte bronzer, subtle highlighter, and two satin-finish eyeshadows in a peachy nude and deep bronze. It’s available starting Jan. 15 at Bluemercury.

A Limited-Release Lunar New Year Edition of Guerlain’s Meteorites Illuminating Pearls

Guerlain’s delicate little pearl-shaped illuminating powders have been a luxe mainstay for many years — but you’ve never seen them dressed up like this before. For a limited time, grab the complexion-perfecting illuminating product in Lunar New Year packaging that’s impossible to ignore on your vanity.

An $8 Gel-Cream Blush By Maybelline

Looking for a drugstore dupe of Glossier’s fan-fave Cloud Paint? Maybelline’s new Cheek Heat could be it. The gel-cream, water-based formula blends into skin seamlessly for a sheer, buildable, and naturally-dewy finish, plus it comes in six wearable shades. It’s up for grabs now at Ulta for just $8 a pop.

Estee Lauder’s Super-Modern Act IV Collection

Estee Lauder’s great-granddaughter, Danielle Lauder, collaborated with the iconic beauty brand on Act IV, a limited-edition range of makeup essentials that landed on Jan. 5. The glam rose gold and marble-packaged line includes the warm, shimmery Spotlight Highlighter, plus lip products, a multi-use palette, brushes, and more.

A Lip Balm That Changes Color To Suit Your Complexion

Milani recently released a rose-enriched line to its drugstore-priced range, including an adaptive lip balm that changes colors while protecting your pout from environmental stressors. Your natural pH determines the sheer shade the lip balm transforms into, while soothing rose oil, hydrating coconut oil, and vitamin E keep lips soft and smooth. Scoop it up now at your local drugstores or online.

ColourPop’s Cool Mint Drop

ColourPop’s at it again with its ultra-cohesive color-coordinated launches — and this time it’s all about icy cool mint green. The full Mint To Be collection is up for grabs now on the brand’s website, and includes a fresh mint green eyeshadow palette, two new shades of Glittery Obsessed gel, two Super Shock Shadows, two creme gel eyeliners, a minty creme gel eye colour pot, and a matcha-infused face milk.

A Solo Travel-Inspired Line By essie

Essie decided to kick 2020 off with a super-bright note, with its wanderlust-inspired Flying Solo range that’s bound to make you book a trip somewhere exciting. The collection includes nine new polish shades that mimic the colors of a setting sky, from peachy pink and golden yellow to deep teal and violet-tinged blue. The collection dropped at the start of January and can be found at Target, Ulta, and essie’s website.

Sephora’s Lash Collab With House Of Lashes

Cruelty-free, 100 percent synthetic lash brand House of Lashes teamed up with Sephora to start the new year off with good vibes and great lashes. The Crystal Collection launched at the beauty retailer on Jan. 3 and includes three different false lash sets inspired by positive energy-emitting Rose Quartz, Aquamarine, and Amethyst, helping you set your intentions for the day as you get your lashes looking good.

With corporates becoming more acceptable and inclusive in their grooming code, a few wardrobe staples can be a navy blazer, a white shirt, unwashed indigo denims and a neat pair of loafers for both men and women

With corporates becoming more acceptable and inclusive in their grooming code, a few wardrobe staples can be a navy blazer, a white shirt, unwashed indigo denims and a neat pair of loafers for both men and women

With corporates becoming more acceptable and inclusive in their grooming code, a few wardrobe staples can be a navy blazer, a white shirt, unwashed indigo denims and a neat pair of loafers for both men and women

Formal is boring and cannot be stylish” is a sort of a misconception now. Workwear has evolved from ‘one style suits all’ to become more flexible and supple so as to cover personal choices. Bold coloured dresses, a chic black blazer paired with classy cowl-neck top, pencil skirt or high-waist trousers now fit well in what is termed as the ‘business casuals’ wardrobe.

Steadily, a trend is gaining popularity among a band of professionals who like to breathe a refreshing tinge of fashion into serious business dressing. The trend imbues job-friendly attire to suit the brand’s image. While some sectors certainly exude authority like bank managers, lawyers, politicians, and for them power dressing is imperative. Wearing clothes that are the right-fit, comfortable and do not restrict movement is important.

The degrees of sartorial formality tend to vary among industries, companies and roles. For law firm professionals, it’s black coat, button-down shirt, trousers; sari or salwar kameez, pant-suit or top — anything but jeans. In case of start-ups, T-shirts, tops, sneakers can be easily included in the wardrobe, much in tune with the easy-going and flexible work atmosphere.

In the banking sector, business formals is still the law. “A smart executive with professional attitude and appearance catches the public eye as he is an ambassador for an efficiently run organisation. Every Yes Banker should be a complete ‘yes professional’ and embody business etiquette, attitude and grooming.

The credence is that the importance of dress code for professionalism cannot be overstated,” feels Deodutta Kurane, senior group president, human capital management, Yes Bank.

Most women seem to prefer traditional Indian attire and there are unlimited options for them. Brands like Taneira, an offering by Titan, are creating a different browsing experience for its customers with its experiential display of saris, fabrics and ready-to-wear. “Women prefer Indian formal wear at workplace as it is more breathable and versatile. Indian weaves and silhouettes are trending globally. For instance, colourful Ikat with regional art make a timeless ensemble as work-wear, and can be teamed with jackets and waist-belts that look professional and chic at the workplace. Tussar saris in pastel hues add grace in a board-room meeting. Linen, cotton and kota saris in subtle tones, when accessorised with silver jewellery, add a regal touch,” says the CEO, Rajeshwari Srinivasan.

With the concept of workwear fundamentally changing, brands and designers are incorporating conscious designs, patterns and colours to suit one’s choice, bringing options to your mundane work wardrobe. Early this year, fashion designer Varija Bajaj ventured into a label heavily influenced by Indian culture, body shapes and skin tone. It is targeted at working women professionals. With the brand Office & You, Bajaj has come up with figure correction techniques, which camouflage those extra inches, giving an illusion of a slim figure. For her, workwear is very individualistic and occasion-driven. “There is no blanket trend for workwear. Some work in air-conditioned environment, some on the field battling the weather, and some create a fashion statement. Women at work define their own rules and sport what reflects their personality. The silhouettes are getting feminine and the colours are reflecting their Indianness. Workwear is well adaptable to given cultural and climatic surroundings — whether you are in a cluttered market, a construction site or stationed in rural areas, the creations must be easy to maintain, functional, wrinkle-free and breathable,” she says.

While dressing to work, it is always recommended to dress smartly and appropriately. Forever New has a versatile collection of desk-to-dinner range. “One can easily adorn a dress and move from work to a cocktail party, or can wear a black jumpsuit for an evening out. Our trendy range is very fashionable yet classic and can be worn from meetings to party — high-waist wide culottes, cigarette pants, chiffon blouses and vintage embroidered shirts for work, gala events and power meetings. In fact, the modern-day urban woman is amplifying her unique personality and individuality, which resonates with her inner beliefs and values,” says Dhruv Bogra, India manager, Forever New.

Keep it casual
Salesh Grover, business head, OSL luxury collections that houses Corneliani dressing, finds business casuals like khaki pants, button-down collared shirts and shoes comfortable. He is of the opinion, “Many companies are pretty lax with the dress code these days, leaving room for comfort. With performance and work efficiency given highest importance, minimalism and utilitarian approach towards dressing has taken a forefront.”

Uniforms have been an essential part of the hospitality sector, and are brand differentiators, helping customers identify the employees easily for better service. At Andaz hotel in Delhi, the case is different. The staff doesn’t wear turbans or saris; instead they’re geared with a variety of designs by Indo-French fashion brand Lecoanet Hemant at work. A rather non-uniform avatar — from the door man till the top officials — the dress code is casual. White tees or tops with short blue-and-white jacket and a lacy blue long coat, even denim dungarees are a common sight. At Seaside Finolhu Baa Atoll, a luxury resort in Maldives which is right in the middle of the island, flip-flops and sunglasses are fashion staples. “Flip-flops are important in this climate, can be stylish and add colour to the look. As long as the glasses are not covered with reflective mirror, one can be stylish and flaunt designer names,” says Edyta Peszko, director of sales and marketing.

A lot of workwear depends on the context — industry, location, function, role, social norms, nature of interaction, time of the day, and even season of the year. Take the case of start-ups and technology enthusiasts. The ease of doing business has given rise to the ease of dressing. With the influx of millennial population and start-up/entrepreneurial culture, one can see that corporate dressing is revolutionising. It has come up the graph as never before. “Comfort is now taking over more in start-ups and corporates,” feels Raghav Verma, co-founder of Chaayos. “This is important as we are now moving to anywhere, anytime connectivity, and a lot of work actually happens from remote locations. What is very important, though, is identity and a connect to the organisation and that is a big trend for start-ups — especially wearing your company logo, badge or uniform most of the time.”

Jaideep Ghosh, Partner & National Head – Transport, Leisure & Sports, KPMG in India, sees myriad factors contributing to the transition from formal to a dress-down environment. A commonly cited reason is that Silicon Valley compelled Wall Street to change. “Tech giants founded in the last two decades by young founders continue their casual dressing. Some served as role models for many things, including their own style. Hence, start-ups are more accustomed to casual work attire. Technology is omnipresent in traditional industries like finance, healthcare, retail and professional services. Global traditional organisations such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, IBM, GE have adapted to a more flexible dress code. For instance, the IT and digital departments in finance companies usually have a relaxed dress code. Internet and connectivity have led to remote-working sans a set dress code. The work environment has also transitioned to more ‘result-oriented’ with less emphasis on ‘formal process-oriented’ approach. Even psychologically, employees increasingly rely on work quality and output vs materialistic aspects like dressing to prove themselves,” says Ghosh, who personally likes to follow simple dress norms: dress as the context demands; keep it simple; and when unsure, dress up. For example, he would be in formal attire for a meeting with a top corporate client and prefer a business-casual attire to visit a manufacturing facility in a suburban industrial area. If unsure on a dress code in an event, he likes to dress down by removing a jacket or tie than the other way round!

For Nina Kler, a freelance media professional, there’s no dress code as she has flexible hours and sometimes works out of a co-working space. “Everyone who comes in is really just a more presentable version of themselves in comfortable clothing. Since there’s no dress code, I wear the same style of clothes to work as I do on the weekends. The only difference is that I wear more dresses, tops when I’m not at work. About a third of my closet is tops and dresses in all colours, shapes and materials,” she says.

The changeover
A recent media report on Japanese social media on dress practices and women in the workplace highlighted how firms had banned wearing glasses for female employees as glasses-wearing shop assistants gave a ‘cold impression’. Wall Street giant Goldman Sachs this year announced ‘firm-wide flexible dress code’ in an internal memo, urging employees to use ‘good judgment’ in their fashion choices. JP Morgan also cited the changing nature of workplaces, generally in favour of a more casual environment that prompted the move to a ‘firm wide flexible dress code’. Brands such as Dockers from Levi Strauss emphasised khakis. Untuckit, an American casual men’s apparel, promotes relaxed fit shirts that are to be worn un-tucked. Umashan Naidoo, head of cosmetics and customer, Westside, says, “Organisations have realised that allowing people to be more flexible in their dressing doesn’t hinder performance but increases it. This allows people to be more expressive, confident and comfortable with themselves.”

One of the biggest drivers of any enduring fashion trend is a shift in lifestyle and society, Francesca Muston, fashion director at WGSN, a trend-forecasting company in New York, finds this as the biggest reason for the casualisation of office wear. “Corporate environment is becoming more relaxed, and there is better representation of women in senior roles. Most businesses relaxed their dress codes several years ago but the athleisure boom — a trend that WGSN forecasted in the early 2000s — has really been instrumental in accelerating a more contemporary and casual way of dressing. The appointments of Virgil Abloh at Louis Vuitton and Kim Jones at Dior have broken down the barriers between luxury fashion and streetwear, especially as these designers are digging their teeth into tailoring.

We see a resurgence of formal looks for both menswear and womenswear, but in the post-athleisure era, comfort and fashion come as a prerequisite, even for tailoring. This essentially means that nothing is stuffy, there is stretch, drape and softness built into silhouettes, and a freedom and confidence to play with colour and print,” says Muston.

Future trends
Ermenegildo Zegna, a leading global luxury menswear brand founded in 1910 in Trivero, Italy, has a retail network covering over 100 countries. Their contemporary mix of formal and luxury leisure wear offers a wide range of looks for men. “If we look at the way men were dressing 30 years ago and how they are dressing now, the differences are significant. Weights, garments and constructions are lighter and men’s suiting has a lot more freedom. The same suit that would have been described as business formal is no longer worn in a formal way — it’s about the combination of having a top and bottom with the same tailoring base,” says Alessandro Sartori, artistic director of Ermenegildo Zegna.

The new collections add an element of freshness to the brand. In Vero Moda’s Autumn Winter 2019 collection, the colour palette is unconventional — neutrals tend to rule the formal wear hues, solid yet distinct colours like teal green, maroon, jewel-toned blue play around to break the monotony while keeping them formal and sharp. Experimenting with silhouettes like palazzo pants, blazers or even culottes; high-waist pants are high on the trend quotient. Layering helps pairing dresses with tailored blazers or cardigans with camisoles and pencil skirts.

Fashion designer Kunal Rawal suggests, “Multi-utility and functional outfits move from workwear to evening-wear to make versatile outfits. Knowing our hectic lifestyle, workwear should be comfort-driven with an infusion of lycra, organic or cotton fabric. The fabric is a big differentiator, moving from the basics and the classics,” says Rawal, adding that fun-patterned, colourful socks make it big too. A well-fit white shirt is something that works all day, and a classic two-button suit paired with denims and T shirt makes for a great evening look.

Rawal says people wear formal sneakers to work. “Stick to materials like faux leather, which can either be patent or formal-looking but are comfortable. Colours like blush pink, old rose pink or olive work well,” he says. One brand that can be identified with smart dressing and not particularly formal attire is Benetton as it presents stylish wear in fun and bright colours. Sundeep Chug, ceo & managing director, says, “It’s no longer selective colours or mundane dressing. The regular pants come in various styles, shirts are styled differently and the dresses have interesting change of hemlines.” Benetton looks at innovations as the key. For example, to make semi-formal wear more contemporary Benetton launched ‘commutable jackets’— comfortable, easy to maintain and don’t crush easily and are ideal for professionals who are always on the go. Knitwear semi-formals are a big trend globally.

Accessories can also be a powerful statement in the boardroom. From the time when wearing fashion accessories to work was frowned upon, modern workplaces have transcended decades to become far more relaxed. Vishwas Shringi, founder of Voylla, (fashion accessories online and offline stores), says, “Subtle accessorising is important. A customised pendant says a lot about you, yet does not grab too much attention. Smart, elegant and classy accessories are now considered a part of good grooming for any professional. Men are looking beyond chains and rings and can accessorise with jewelled cufflinks. Stacked charm bracelets for women and braided or metallic ones for men are well-accepted at work irrespective of the profession.” With corporates becoming more acceptable and inclusive in their grooming code, Naidoo suggests a few wardrobe staples as navy blazer, a white shirt, unwashed indigo denims and a neat pair of loafers for men and women. Women must invest in a well cut shift dress and a pleat skirt. Silhouettes should contour the body but not be figure-hugging and the fabrics should not be jazzy but in matte.

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Howard Beige, executive vice president of Rubie’s Costume Co., talks pop culture costumes, decor demand, a Saturday Halloween, and more.

Toy Book: What are some costumes or properties that outperformed expectations in 2019?
Howard Beige:
Spider-Man, Avengers: Endgame, It Chapter 2, Stranger Things, The Joker, classic Ghostbusters, and horror properties in general were some of the best-selling costumes last year. Baby Shark was a late-season addition that was on fire!

TB: What Halloween and costume trends do you expect to see this year?
HB: With a Saturday Halloween this year, we will see an increase in tween/teen and adult Halloween participation. There will be more parties with the entire family celebrating. Also, the pet costume category will continue to grow.

TB: Last year was packed with blockbuster movies, from Avengers: Endgame to Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. This year doesn’t have those major releases on the calendar. What impact, if any, do you think this will have on costume sales this year?
HB: There is a lot more content coming in 2020. In addition to major films, such as Wonder Woman 1984, Birds of Prey, Black Widow, Venom 2, Ghostbusters: Afterlife, Top Gun Maverick, and Minions: The Rise of Gru, there is a tremendous amount of new streaming video-on-demand services that will have major new content, such as The Mandalorian, Marvel’s Spider-Man Maximum Venom, The Falcon and The Winter Soldier, Watchmen, and much more.

I think consumers have many favorite characters and always have a choice for their costume. We do see more of a pop culture influence in costume properties, so there are always many things trending that will capture our customers’ attention.

TB: There has been a significant increase in female superheroes and female-led movies in the past couple of years. How has this impacted costume trends?
HB: These strong role models have been credited with the girl-power trend. Princesses and damsels in distress have dropped significantly in popularity, while strong women have gained popularity. We are also seeing girls wanting to dress in jumpsuit costumes and not in the frilly tutu dresses that they used to like. We are now positioning many of these as unisex or gender-neutral. Another trend we’re seeing is the popularity of horror characters among young girls.

TB: The National Retail Federation reported that social media has a growing influence on Halloween costumes. In what ways do social media and influencer culture impact the products that Rubie’s creates?
HB: Rubie’s has looked to social media as a source of inspiration for many years. As we typically start to develop costumes about 18 months in advance, we look to social media — as well as high fashion — for trends on the horizon. We have also greatly expanded our line of costume separates, which allow the wearer to still be the character they choose but to use a blend of our costume separates and their own apparel to create an individualized look. This allows a group of three to four people to attend a party in a similar theme, yet still have their own unique look.

TB: Rubie’s has a significant presence at many fan conventions, including New York Comic Con and Comic-Con International: San Diego. What makes these events a good fit for Rubie’s? What does the company get out of these events, and in what ways does Rubie’s connect with fans?
HB: Rubie’s exhibits at these consumer shows as part of our support for the studio licenses we hold, as well as to interact directly with today’s cosplayers. It’s helpful for us to be there so that consumers know us as the brand behind the license. It’s also helpful for us to gain insight into ongoing and upcoming trends that cosplayers are passionate about.

TB: What trends do you see in the Pet Boutique line, and how closely do they mirror trends in human costumes?
HB: Pet costume trends mimic kid and adult costume trends. Pets today are an integral part of the family, and humans buy for their pets as they would for their infant, toddler, or child. Many pets today are dressed as the sidekick of the child or parent. For example, the pet may be dressed as Robin while the child is dressed as Batman. And, pet owners can easily dress up their pets in accessories and costumes throughout the year. We have the largest collection of pet accessories, toys, and costumes for year-round sales opportunities.

TB: The Imagine by Rubie’s line features dress-up items for many popular licenses. How does the process for developing a role-play item differ from the process for developing a full costume?
HB: Everyday dress-up or role-play costumes by Imagine are typically constructed to be more durable, as they are used for extended play opportunities. We also provide muscle tops and masks, capes, and other accessories, but the child wears his or her own pants. Full costumes are typically worn one, maybe two times for the season, and the following year the child wants to be something else.

TB: We are in an era of reboots, including the upcoming Top Gun: Maverick and Ghostbusters: Afterlife. How do these new takes on classic movies impact costume trends? Do they increase demand for costumes based on the original properties?
HB: While these iconic movies’ reboots are always looked forward to, consumers are very loyal to the original characters, and we typically see higher demand for the classic costumes.

TB: What new trends do you see in the way people celebrate Halloween?
HB: More people celebrate as a family and/or group. Families are dressing in themes — such as Minions, Wizard of Oz, Ghostbusters, superheroes, Star Wars, etc. — including children, infants, and pets. People of all ages are more inclined to decorate, both inside and outside their homes. Decor is a fast-growing Halloween category, as is pets.

TB: Where does Rubie’s see most of its sales: online, traditional brick-and-mortar locations, Halloween pop-ups, or elsewhere?
HB: National retailers, specialty retailers, and independent retailers are still the largest part of our business. Online sales continue to grow.

TB: Rubie’s launched a new line of life-sized statues of many pop culture characters. How did that line come to be, and what has the consumer/industry response been like for the products?
HB: We have made a number of these life-sized statues over the years, but the new ones are made of a lighter-weight fabrication, which allows for lower shipping rates and a more affordable product. Many retailers have wanted to feature some in their stores and are now better able to afford these statues. Our comic book fans love them, and many have purchased their favorite characters for their own homes.

TB: Rubie’s also owns decor and prop companies Forum Novelties and Morbid Enterprises. What trends are you seeing in Halloween decor, or in holiday decor in general?
HB: We are seeing more consumers purchase more decor, both for inside and outside their homes. We are also developing decor at many different price points to meet the budgets of a much larger group of consumers who wish to decorate their homes.

TB: In 2018, Rubie’s officially voiced support for the Saturday Halloween movement. What is the status of that petition, and why do you believe a Saturday Halloween would be preferable?
HB: This petition showed us and the Halloween Costume Association that many consumers are traditionalists and are not in favor of moving Halloween to any day other than October 31. The Halloween Costume Association’s intent was to allow Halloween to always fall on a Saturday, when trick-or-treating could take place during daylight and therefore be safer for children. This way, parents could also easily participate without having to leave work early, and then at night everyone could celebrate Halloween together at home.

The Halloween Costume Association is now supporting National Trick-or-Treat Day, also being promoted as #ALLOWEEN, which makes the last Saturday of October one more opportunity to celebrate in a safer environment and as a family.


This article originally appeared in the December/January 2020 issue of the Toy Book.

A lot can happen in a year. Some of it good, some of it, well, you know… From craft whiskey to gravel biking to 5G-enabled smartphones, here are the products and trends our team expects to dominate the next 12 months.

Mechanical watches get cheaper

“We’re about to see a lot more variety when it comes to mechanical watch movements utilized by brands large and small. Following an antitrust ruling banning the Swatch Group from supplying ETA movements to its rivals this year, alternative movements from Selitta, STP and Seiko (whose column wheel-operated NE86 movement is an affordable alternative to the famed Valjoux 7750 produced by ETA) are going to come to the fore. While the Swatch Group certainly isn’t thrilled with this development, it means more competition and the proliferation of less expensive — though well-made — alternative movements. For the consumer, that’s a good thing.” — Oren Hartov, Associate Editor

Slim-tapered loosens up

“‘Hey, buddy, eyes up here,’ is going to be heard a lot this year. Except it’s not what you think, because 2020 is going to be the year of the statement pant. The funkier, the better; the more flared, the more far-out; mo’ prints, mo’ fun. Look no further for confirmation than Harry Styles wearing a pair of high-waisted, flared trousers (and, yes, this is also the year we call our bottoms trousers). In the zeitgeist, the Council of Fashion Designers of America named Emily Adams Bode as its emerging designer of the year award for her label Bode, which specializes in using deadstock one-of-a-kind fabrics to make statement menswear pieces, including a range of printed trousers with loose, breezy fits. And if this all comes full circle, and we return to our slim tapered days, at least you’ll know how to get your pants tailored properly.” — Tyler Chin, Editorial Associate, Editorial Operations

Hemp makes it to the mall, and your closet

“The cannabis industry is booming. In recent years, the legalization of recreational marijuana in numerous states has led to a veritable gold rush with new brands materializing overnight in almost every cannabis-tangential industry. While 2019 showed that CBD can be marketed and sold in things from coffee and tea to lotions and pills, 2020 is the year for another byproduct of the marijuana plant: hemp. We’ve seen a few specialized brands offer clothing made with hemp in previous years, but this year, the miracle fiber is going mainstream. Expect to see it in jeans, button-up shirts, sweats and more, all available at your local mall.” — John Zientek, Associate Editor

5G arrives in force (but you won’t need it)

“In 2019, the first super-fast 5G networks started to launch, with companies all over the world claiming to be first. In 2020, the hardware will start catching up. Samsung already has a few 5G phones; it even claim to have sold over 6 million units — chiefly in its home country of South Korea. But in 2020, rumor has it, 5G will arrive stateside with the first 5G-capable iPhones.

While 5G’s blistering speed is impressive — it’s proving to be at least ten times faster than 4G — it’s probably not something you’ll want or need quite yet. Bleeding-edge 5G phones are more expensive than their 4G counterparts, run extremely hot and chew through battery at a ridiculous rate, all while relying on network infrastructure that’s not yet widespread, offering speeds you’d be hard-pressed to use anyway. Expect to hear a lot of hype this year, and brace yourself not to fall for it.” — Eric Limer, Editor

Craft beer grows up, for better or worse

“By the end of the year, America will have more than 8,000 breweries. That’s almost double what it was just five years ago. This means more competition in an already dwindling slice of the beverage pie for beer (although craft beer is still outperforming the overall beer market). And as much as we don’t like to admit it, 2019 was the year of hard seltzer — and it’s not going anywhere.

“2020 will demand craft breweries adapt to this changing alcohol landscape: More breweries will add seltzer labels to their production to become beverage companies. Big brewery purchases of 2019 (Dogfish Head, New Belgium Brewing and Ballast Point) will spill over into 2020 — along with a notable closure or two. Taprooms and local communities will become increasingly important for breweries. Lastly, exciting and informative ways to educate drinkers will become crucial for breweries to keep their shares of the pie; people like Em Sauter are going to be prominent voices in craft beer to help educate non-beer nerd consumers to retain attention in beer.” — Ryan Brower, Project Coordinator, Editorial Operations

Sustainable packaging stops being optional

“From Amazon Prime boxes to plastic beer holders, packaging — you know, the stuff that contributes to more than 80 million tons of waste a year — corners us from all directions. And only half of it ever gets recycled. In the last few years, we’ve seen hints of change: cardboard beer sleeves that hold together six-packs, fiber-based plastics to store and ship iPhones (thanks for that one, Apple). REI, a leader in the space, has forgone individual poly bags for t-shirts and similar apparel by implementing a so-called “sushi-roll” packaging method — products are rolled up and secured with a twine-like piece of paper. In 2020, we’ll see even more elegant solutions in sustainable packaging. Hopefully, come December, we’ll no longer call it a trend but a standard.” — Jack Seemer, Deputy Editor

Phones get dumber … and better

“Most people just aren’t willing to shell out over $1,000 for a smartphone. Yes, each model boasts a good deal of improvements over the last — but they’re marginal at best. A slightly better camera. A slightly nicer display. A slightly longer battery life. And their primary purpose? To scroll endlessly on the social media platforms we’ve soured on. In 2020, we’re going to see more people using paired-down technology like the Light Phone II or Plunkt. We’ll also likely see bigger tech companies make entries into the product category. Apparently, Apple is working on the follow up to its iPhone SE. Fewer distractions for less money? It’s hard not to see that catching on.” — J.D. DiGiovanni, Associate Editor, Editorial Operations

Gravel moms are the new soccer moms

“In the 1880s, what we now think of as a bicycle was called a ‘safety bicycle’ because it was so much less dangerous than the high-wheeled penny-farthing. In 2020, gravel bikes may begin to overtake their road bike predecessors in a similar way. With city streets getting increasingly dangerous for cyclists, a pedal-pusher’s safest move may be to hit the dirt, and more and more of them are. Every state but Hawaii hosted a gravel event last year, a new gravel race in Northwest Arkansas sold out in five minutes, and even financial media noted the growing popularity of the sport. This year, we’ll see the industry continue to respond by launching awesome new bikes and accessories and even e-bikes in the gravel space, to the point where even your mom will think about getting one.” — Steve Mazzucchi, Editor

Streaming services empty your wallet

“Netflix would never be enough. We also have Hulu and Amazon Prime Video, as well as the newly launched Disney+ and Apple TV+. Oh, and then there’s your music — Spotify, Apple Music.

This year, HBO will launch HBO Max with a bunch of new shows, like the Game of Thrones prequel and some of your favorite oldies, like Friends and The Big Bang Theory. Discovery is going to have a service, too, with cool documentary series like Blue Planet. And then there’s NBCUniversal’s anticaptied Peacock, which will be the destination for sitcoms like The Office and Parks and Recreation.

By the end of this year, we’ll all be sinking way more into streaming services. And we’ll still be paying for cable because, frankly, it’s still not going to make enough sense to cut the cord.” — Tucker Bowe, Staff Writer

Craft whiskey gets serious (and tasty)

“Craft whiskey sucked. Largely because ‘craft’ means squat, but also because running a whiskey business on a small-scale that makes any money at all has, historically speaking, proved next to impossible. A distiller needs a huge amount of cash to get started — for barrels, stills, experienced staff, rickhouses, connections with distributors, bottling facilities, etc. — but cash alone is nothing. Time is the enemy. Nobody is clamoring for one-, two-, three- or four-year-old brown — what kind of startup can’t sell a respectable product four years into operation? Thankfully, we’re now enough years removed from the whiskey boom for those once-nascent distillers to have opened up shop, made their bets and put their own whiskey rest, mature, sell and, potentially, stand a fighting chance against the macro-whiskey titans. Watch brands like New Riff, Willet (their own stuff, not the sourced bottles), Old Elk, Westward and Balcones carve out more territory in liquor stores — and your bar cart.” — Will Price, Assistant Editor

You buy a used watch

“Buying a “certified pre-owned” watch is easier than ever. Outfits like WatchBox or Crown & Caliber have become established parts of the luxury watch landscape, and even traditional retailers like Bucherer are entering the game. While the demand for affordable watches has never been higher, people still want nice stuff, and services that “check” a pre-owned watch’s health and authenticity will help people buy more confidently.” — Zen Love, Staff Writer

And outdoor gear …

“Since thrift stores became an acceptable and even desirable place to purchase clothing, fashion industry pioneers have innovated new ways to dress us in worn threads. Now, the clothing racks are digital, and business is booming. In 2019, The RealReal became the first secondhand clothing company to trade publicly, and the consignment company ThredUp projects the market to hit $51 billion by 2023. Sustainability-minded outdoor gear companies have taken note; in the latter half of the 2010s, Patagonia, Arc’teryx and REI ranked among those to open web-based used gear shops. REI estimates that it sold nearly one million used items in 2019 alone, and its revenue from those sales was almost twice that of the previous year. With more people heading outside than ever, we can only expect these numbers to grow.” — Tanner Bowden, Staff Writer

And streetwear …

For style, streetwear obsessives will shift into buying less of-the-moment pieces as vintage continues to take more of the piece of the pie. The same reasons fans of streetwear fawn over exclusive drops and limited releases, will be the impetus for them to flock to vintage stores in search one-of-a-kind pieces. Before streetwear king Virgil Abloh made the prediction for the new decade, the demand for vintage has soared for years making up $11 billion of sales in 2012 jumping to $24 billion in 2018. It’s also expected to double again by 2023. In 2020, we’ll see the continued shift toward secondhand take a more noticeable toll on the streetwear industry and by extension, trends overall. — Gerald Ortiz, Staff Writer

Collabs get weird. Like real weird.

In 2020 we’ll see more collaborations by entities that don’t really belong together. Take, for example, the Stranger Things x MLB collab: Why would I want an MLB logo on my Stranger Things hat, or a Stranger Things logo on my MLB hat? These franchises are not even tangentially related, and the product of such a collaboration is a confusing one that nobody asked for. Nonetheless, we’ll be seeing more of it this year as companies try to cash in, imitating brands doing collaborations that actually make sense. Like Patagonia and Danner. — Scott Ulrich, Editorial Associate, Editorial Operations

Normal people drive electric cars

“Luxury manufacturers such as Porsche, Jaguar, and Audi have already gotten in on the EV game. Startups Rivian and Bollinger Motors have high-end electric trucks ready for production. But established affordable manufacturers like Ford and Volkswagen launching affordable EV crossovers could be game-changing, not to mention the Mini EV potentially starting below $20,000 in some states. You may not go electric in 2020. But 2020 will be the year you start seeing your otherwise normal friends, neighbors and relatives do so. Not just that one guy down the street who is way too eager to talk about his Tesla.” — Tyler Duffy, Staff Writer

Wellness gets (even more) personalized

“For years, personal trainers have been an easy way to customize your weight loss or muscle gain journey, and now it’s looking like that’s expanding across all aspects of wellness. 2019 brought us customizable vitamins, protein powders, and boutique doctors’ offices that are made to suit your needs, like Parsley Health and The Well. Workout gear from Mirror and Tonal also brought the personal trainer home via a machine. Wellness has to be customizable for it to really work for you (think about sleep and nutrition), so it makes sense that we’re seeing that rise. In 2020, we’ll see even more offerings for at-home personal training, likely in big-name brand apps, as well as in the gear that goes along with it.” — Meg Lappe, Editorial Coordinator

Self-driving cars park on the back burner

“The last decade was dominated by a narrative that cars and trucks would, one day, be capable of driving themselves anytime, anywhere. The tweens of the Twenty-Teens would never even need drivers’ licenses, people predicted, because ever-present fleets of robo-rides will be around to take them anywhere for less money than owning a car. Tesla owners would be able to rent out their Model 3s as self-driving taxis when not in use, enabling them to make passive income. Hell, Uber even built an entire business model around the idea that they simply needed to subsidize the cost of paying human drivers until self-driving cars could replace them.

Expect to see more of companies tamping down expectations in 2020. The combined brainpower and billions of Silicon Valley, Detroit, Germany and Japan have yet to come close to cracking the secret sauce of a true self-driving car; the best results so far to see widespread adoption are little more than souped-up cruise control. And while the research will go on — there’s just too much money to be made someday for whoever gets it right — the next year of self-driving car news will be more about making human-driven cars safer through better advanced driver-assistance systems than giving us rides we can nap in on our way home.” — Will Sabel Courtney, Editor

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DUBAI: It’s back to work for Shanina Shaik. The model, who was just in the Swiss Alps for the holidays, jetted off to Milan on Friday to attend the Ermenegildo Zegna Fall 2020 Menswear fashion show, where she sat front row alongside Fear of God designer Jerry Lorenzo, American actor Quincy and British model Erin O’Connor.

The Saudi-Pakistani-Lithuanian-Australian beauty cut a sleek figure in a plunging black blazer, which she wore with matching trousers plucked from the Italian label’s new collection. She completed the look with a pair of contrasting, chunky white sneakers.

If her recent front row appearance is any indication, 2020 is shaping up to be a much more pleasant year for the model than last year.

Shaik had previously revealed 2019 was “the most difficult year of her life,” largely due to her split with longtime partner Greg “DJ Ruckus” Andrews, one-year after they wed. 

It didn’t get any better after it was announced that the annual Victoria’s Secret show was cancelled, in which the 28-year-old served as a runway fixture.

However, things do appear to be shaping up as the Melbourne-bred beauty entered the new year on a high note, after fronting the cover of Harper’s Bazaar Arabia’s January 2020 issue.

Some of the other famous faces who were spotted front row during Milan Men’s Fashion Week include Solange, Kelela, Juliana Huxtable and Michele Lamy, as well as British designer Grace Wales Bonner, who just showed her menswear collection in London a few days ago.

Once upon a time, not so long ago, the mere suggestion of a wedding dress from the high-street would’ve filled a bride-to-be with fear and indignation.

Despite the fact that the average wedding in 2019 costed £31,974, scrimping on The Dress for The Big Day just never seemed a plausible possibility. 

But I’ve got news for you: the high-street have been busy churning out some fabulously stylish – and affordable – designs.

In fact, according to Bridebook’s National Wedding Survey in 2018, 16 per cent of bride-to-be’s chose a wedding dress that they could wear again. 

But just because a wedding dress is affordable doesn’t mean it necessarily shuns the traditional trimmings, from taffeta to trains to tulle – far from it, in fact.

Plus, the money you save can be spent on a more indulgent cake, a far-flung honeymoon destination, or whatever takes your fancy.

Whistles 

Whistles Wedding’s new collection launches on February 6 (Whistles)

Since launching its bridal line, Whistles Wedding, in February 2017, high-street hero Whistles has become a solid favourite among the bridal community.

Offered in silk, lace, organza jacquard and embroidered tulle, each style is designed with subtle detailing; think scalloped edges, detachable trains, modern ruffles and romantic elliptical hemlines.

And it’s not just dresses that Whistles are nailing, it also has some seriously sharp white suits which are perfect power-bride attire.

The Whistles Wedding collection is available online and in-store at Whistles London flagship store, where customers can pre-book private bridal appointments for the bride and bridesmaids.    

Prices: £299 – £699.

whistles.com

H&M

H&M Bridal (H&M)

H&M has created some seriously expensive-looking wedding dresses which are astonishingly purse-friendly. 

And not only are there wedding dresses perfect options for brides, it also has bridesmaid dresses in muted pastel hues.

The only slight glitch is that the wedding range is an online-exclusive, meaning you can’t try before you buy, but with such low price tags, and with IRL stores peppered up and down the country, returning and exchanging shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

Prices: £49.99 – £199.99.

hm.com

ASOS

ASOS Bridal (ASOS)

Those on the prowl for the perfect fishtails and on-trend silhouettes need look no further: this line is The One. 

ASOS Bridal covers all potential sartorial bases, from mini’s to midi’s to maxi’s, all under one site. 

In fact, so popular is their bridal range that the brand’s ASOS EDITION lace long sleeve crop top maxi wedding dress (£120) was worn by 3,500 brides on their big days last year. 

Prices: £24.99 – £375

asos.com

Reformation

Reformation’s Bridal brand is a sure-fire bridal win (Reformation)

The sustainable hero brand Reformation really can’t put a well-heeled foot out of step. 

Its bridal range (launched in 2017) is everything that the brand itself stands for: minimalistic, refined and covetable. These are some dresses that are going to leave your guests, and the bride, seriously swooning. 

Reformation is a great eco-friendly shout for guests, bridesmaids and mother-of-the brides alike. 

Prices: £275- £535

reformation.com

Oasis

Oasis’ Wedding Shop has you covered (Oasis)

Oasis’ line, which launched at the start of this year, promises a show-stopping selection of five dresses which will shock even the most sartorially-savvy with how sophisticated they are. 

The best news is that all of them are under £300.

Not only are the options fit for a bride, but the bridesmaid offerings are also stellar, with some costing as little as £85. 

Prices: £200 – £300.

oasis.com

By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi | Published: January 11, 2020 12:30:13 pm

Deepika padukone, priyanka chopra, alia bhatt, Gingham, Gingham fashion

Which is more of your Gingham style? (Designed by Gargi Singh)

Bollywood can turn any fashion trend into a wardrobe staple, turning it into an instant hit when they step out. And now that we’re well into winter, we are already missing the summers. Last season, a trend that made a comeback was the gingham pattern. So we dug in to find some inspiration from Bollywood fashion files and the results are total goals.

Here is a Bollywood celeb-approved take on gingham trend.

Deepika Padukone

Deepika Padukone went for a summery look as she stepped out in a checkered co-ord set from the label Anna Mason. Styled by Shaleena Nathani, the look worked for the knotted crop top and button-down skirt. It was rounded out with hair tied at the back and accessorised with fun gold earrings.

Alia Bhatt

ranbir kapoor and alia bhatt

Ranbir Kapoor and Alia Bhatt also marked their presence. (Express photo: Varinder Chawla)

Alia Bhatt opted for a Prabal Gurung outfit — an asymmetrical checkered dress consisting of two different colours — which looked lovely on her. The dress, which also featured a cutout detail at the waist, was rounded out with strappy heels and completed with hair parted at the centre and light pink lipstick.

Kangana Ranaut

Kangana Ranaut picked a gingham print dress for the screening of her film and it left us drooling. We think she looks lovely in this full-sleeve dress from Manoush, designed by Frédérique Trou-Roy with the gorgeous floral embroidery collar, ruffle details in the front and small pleats on the skirt. Ami Patel styled it well with a pair of white Tod’s loafers with simple gold embellishments.

Priyanka Chopra Jonas

Priyanka Chopra opted for a gingham co-ord set for a dinner date with husband Nick Jonas. The monochrome outfit seemed perfect for summers. She teamed it with a pair of white heels and a matching mini handbag. For makeup, she went for a nude palette with marsala lips and hair tied into a ponytail.

priyanka chopra pics

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas in Mumbai (Photo credit: Instagram/pcourheartbeat)

nick jonas, priyanka chopra photos

Priyanka Chopra and Nick struck a pose for the shutterbugs in Mumbai on Friday night. (Photo: Priyankaworlds/Instagram)

priyanka chopra spotted with Nick Jonas in mumbai

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas left hand in hand from the restaurant in Mumbai. (Photo: Priyankaworlds/Instagram)

Which is more of your gingham style?

For all the latest Lifestyle News, download Indian Express App

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Since 2020 is here, we finally feel like we can safely say it: 2019 was a landmark year for beauty. We saw the rise of experimental and imperfect eye makeup, We saw avant-garde eyeliner, impactful eye shadow, and colourful glitter everywhere. We also saw the rise of softly illuminated complexions and peachy-pink lip colours (perhaps this was a response to the dramatic contour and highlighter looks of yesteryear?). There was even a major resurgence in certain ’90s-inspired trends, such as bold blue eye shadow, black pencil eyeliner, and gloss-slick lips.” data-reactid=”18″>Since 2020 is here, we finally feel like we can safely say it: 2019 was a landmark year for beauty. We saw the rise of experimental and imperfect eye makeup, We saw avant-garde eyeliner, impactful eye shadow, and colourful glitter everywhere. We also saw the rise of softly illuminated complexions and peachy-pink lip colours (perhaps this was a response to the dramatic contour and highlighter looks of yesteryear?). There was even a major resurgence in certain ’90s-inspired trends, such as bold blue eye shadow, black pencil eyeliner, and gloss-slick lips.

Where does that leave us for 2020? Well, this is an exciting time for beauty enthusiasts because what we deem trendy now will no doubt develop and evolve to eventually epitomise the entire decade to come. Are you ready? We are. Keep scrolling to see the biggest makeup trend predictions for the coming year, according to five of the top celebrity makeup artists.

1. Exaggerated Eye Shapes 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="According to Sofia Schwarzkopf Tilbury, creative executive of Charlotte Tilbury. "I think the eyes are going to be a huge focus for makeup in 2020. One of my favourite trends that I've created recently and seen on lots of red carpets and runways&nbsp;is pops of colour on the eye.&nbsp;It’s all about creating gorgeous, exaggerated shapes; using softly blurred and blended blocks of colour so they’re not too defined. I love it when I see someone wearing an eye colour look that’s not wearing them—more just enhancing their features!"” data-reactid=”23″>According to Sofia Schwarzkopf Tilbury, creative executive of Charlotte Tilbury. “I think the eyes are going to be a huge focus for makeup in 2020. One of my favourite trends that I’ve created recently and seen on lots of red carpets and runways is pops of colour on the eye. It’s all about creating gorgeous, exaggerated shapes; using softly blurred and blended blocks of colour so they’re not too defined. I love it when I see someone wearing an eye colour look that’s not wearing them—more just enhancing their features!”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Charlotte Tilbury Hot Lips Lipstick in Electric Poppy (£25)” data-reactid=”31″>Charlotte Tilbury Hot Lips Lipstick in Electric Poppy (£25)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""I created a really gorgeous, colourful look at Olivia Rubin's London Fashion Week show this year using bright pink Charlotte Tilbury&nbsp;Hot Lips Lipstick&nbsp;in Electric Poppy&nbsp;(£25), and multi-tasking with our&nbsp;Magic Vanish Colour Corrector in Tan&nbsp;(£24) to cheat a pop of orange—but you can use eye shadows or liners too," she says. "Charlotte’s palettes are perfect for this—from pops of pink and bold blues to sparkling silvers, burnished reds, and golden greens. You can really use any colour; it’s&nbsp;such a fun, playful and experimental trend!"” data-reactid=”32″>”I created a really gorgeous, colourful look at Olivia Rubin’s London Fashion Week show this year using bright pink Charlotte Tilbury Hot Lips Lipstick in Electric Poppy (£25), and multi-tasking with our Magic Vanish Colour Corrector in Tan (£24) to cheat a pop of orange—but you can use eye shadows or liners too,” she says. “Charlotte’s palettes are perfect for this—from pops of pink and bold blues to sparkling silvers, burnished reds, and golden greens. You can really use any colour; it’s such a fun, playful and experimental trend!”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Charlotte Tilbury Magic Vanish Colour Corrector in Tan (£24)” data-reactid=”40″>Charlotte Tilbury Magic Vanish Colour Corrector in Tan (£24)

2. Pops of Blue

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="If there's one colour that you should be expecting to see more of in 2020, it's blue. That's according to Kelsey Deenihan, celebrity makeup artist and Lorac&nbsp;artistry advisor. It only makes sense. After all, Pantone recently announced that Classic Blue is the 2020 colour the year. It’s a bold shade of blue that’s "suggestive of the sky at dusk," and inspires feelings of peace and tranquility.” data-reactid=”42″>If there’s one colour that you should be expecting to see more of in 2020, it’s blue. That’s according to Kelsey Deenihan, celebrity makeup artist and Lorac artistry advisor. It only makes sense. After all, Pantone recently announced that Classic Blue is the 2020 colour the year. It’s a bold shade of blue that’s “suggestive of the sky at dusk,” and inspires feelings of peace and tranquility.

“Blue clearly will be on everyone’s radar in 2020,” she says. She suggests finding fun ways to play with colour, such as “taking an unexpected bright shade and creating a sharp winged cat eye.” Personally, we’re partial to the bold blue eye makeup look she created for Millie Bobby Brown.

3. White Eyeliner

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Pair that pop of blue with a crisp white eyeliner (or a contrasting&nbsp;colourful shade) because celebrity makeup artist&nbsp;Patrick Ta, who works with the likes of Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Dua Lipa, Camila Cabello, and Gigi Hadid, predicts nontraditional eyeliner colours will continue to grow more and more popular. "Cream and white eyeliner are going to be huge," he says. "Especially for those who are afraid of a traditional black liner, this trend will be a great introduction!"&nbsp;” data-reactid=”53″>Pair that pop of blue with a crisp white eyeliner (or a contrasting colourful shade) because celebrity makeup artist Patrick Ta, who works with the likes of Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Dua Lipa, Camila Cabello, and Gigi Hadid, predicts nontraditional eyeliner colours will continue to grow more and more popular. “Cream and white eyeliner are going to be huge,” he says. “Especially for those who are afraid of a traditional black liner, this trend will be a great introduction!” 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="We like how sharp and crisp white eyeliner looks with long, fluttery lashes.&nbsp;Try the trend for yourself in a low-risk, low-commitment way by using NYX&nbsp;White Liquid Eyeliner (£7). Even though it’s only £7, the tip allows for precise application, and the formula is smooth and opaque.” data-reactid=”56″>We like how sharp and crisp white eyeliner looks with long, fluttery lashes. Try the trend for yourself in a low-risk, low-commitment way by using NYX White Liquid Eyeliner (£7). Even though it’s only £7, the tip allows for precise application, and the formula is smooth and opaque.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="NYX White Liquid Eyeliner (£7)” data-reactid=”64″>NYX White Liquid Eyeliner (£7)

4. Colorful Eyeliner

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="If not white eyeliner, 2020 is going to see a continuation of 2019's colourful eyeliner trend. "Pastels and neons are also going to be big, especially when worn with contrasting shades," Ta says. Try pairing pink with red, blue with orange, or any other contrasting combination of colour. "Post-Euphoria&nbsp;everyone is feeling a little adventurous, and I’m here for it!"” data-reactid=”68″>If not white eyeliner, 2020 is going to see a continuation of 2019’s colourful eyeliner trend. “Pastels and neons are also going to be big, especially when worn with contrasting shades,” Ta says. Try pairing pink with red, blue with orange, or any other contrasting combination of colour. “Post-Euphoria everyone is feeling a little adventurous, and I’m here for it!

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Dior Diorshow Liner Star in 351 Turquoise (£28)” data-reactid=”76″>Dior Diorshow Liner Star in 351 Turquoise (£28)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Celebrity makeup artist and Dior Makeup ambassador&nbsp;Sabrina Bedrani agrees that the colourful eyeliner trend will explode in 2020. "I think coloured eyeliner will be a big thing in the New Year because it’s a fun way to experiment with colours without taking too much risk," she says.&nbsp;
” data-reactid=”77″>Celebrity makeup artist and Dior Makeup ambassador Sabrina Bedrani agrees that the colourful eyeliner trend will explode in 2020. “I think coloured eyeliner will be a big thing in the New Year because it’s a fun way to experiment with colours without taking too much risk,” she says. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="She also predicts that bright eye shadow palettes, like the Dior&nbsp;5 Couleurs Happy 2020 Edition "Party in Colours" Palette (£50) will become the norm. "I think people are taking more chances with their makeup. I’m definitely seeing more bold look with bright colours."&nbsp;” data-reactid=”78″>She also predicts that bright eye shadow palettes, like the Dior 5 Couleurs Happy 2020 Edition “Party in Colours” Palette (£50) will become the norm. “I think people are taking more chances with their makeup. I’m definitely seeing more bold look with bright colours.” 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Dior 5 Couleurs Happy 2020 Edition Party in Colours Palette (£50)” data-reactid=”86″>Dior 5 Couleurs Happy 2020 Edition Party in Colours Palette (£50)

4. Classic Products (Like Red Lipstick)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="According to celebrity makeup artist Monika Blunder, who works with the likes of Amanda Seyfried, January Jones, and Gemma Chan, 2020 will also usher in a resurgence of classic makeup looks and products (yup, 2020 will be a year that&nbsp;juxtaposes the traditional with the trendy). "Classics are huge right now, and they will continue to be in 2020! A classic red like Clé de Peau Beauté&nbsp;Lipstick Cashmere in 103 Legend&nbsp;(£50) will never go out of style and will be making a bold appearance in the New Year," she says.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”90″>According to celebrity makeup artist Monika Blunder, who works with the likes of Amanda Seyfried, January Jones, and Gemma Chan, 2020 will also usher in a resurgence of classic makeup looks and products (yup, 2020 will be a year that juxtaposes the traditional with the trendy). “Classics are huge right now, and they will continue to be in 2020! A classic red like Clé de Peau Beauté Lipstick Cashmere in 103 Legend (£50) will never go out of style and will be making a bold appearance in the New Year,” she says. 

That’s good to hear because even though we absolutely love experimenting with shape and colour, we couldn’t part ways with our classic red lipstick or sharp winged liner if we tried.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Clé de Peau Beauté Lipstick Cashmere in 103 Legend (£50)” data-reactid=”99″>Clé de Peau Beauté Lipstick Cashmere in 103 Legend (£50)

5. Softly Illuminated Complexions

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Another trend that Tilbury predicts will continue on into&nbsp;2020 is a softly illuminated complexion. Unlike the strobe looks of yesteryear, this trend is all about a soft,&nbsp;lit-from-within radiance. "Glow will never be out of trend, but for 2020 I feel like highlighting products and complexion boosters are really going to get amped up for the ultimate flawless glow," she says.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”103″>Another trend that Tilbury predicts will continue on into 2020 is a softly illuminated complexion. Unlike the strobe looks of yesteryear, this trend is all about a soft, lit-from-within radiance. “Glow will never be out of trend, but for 2020 I feel like highlighting products and complexion boosters are really going to get amped up for the ultimate flawless glow,” she says. 

As for which products she recommends using in order to achieve that radiant “I just returned from a two-week vacation in the Maldives” sort of glow, Tilbury says she’s crazy about Charlotte Tilbury’s Hollywood Flawless Filter. “It’s a customizable complexion booster that you can use on its own, underneath foundation, and as a highlighter… In the New Year, everyone is trying to look fresh and dewy and glowing, and this is such an easy way to achieve that trend!”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Flawless Filter (£32)” data-reactid=”114″>Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Flawless Filter (£32)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""We're also going to see that glow on the eyes, lips, and cheeks," Tilbury continues. "For a couple of years, matte lips have been huge, but gloss is really making a comeback. I often finish a lip look with a slick of&nbsp;Lip Lustre&nbsp;(£19) or&nbsp;Superstar Lips Glossy Lipstick&nbsp;(£25) on top to add a plumper-looking, sumptuous finish with a gorgeous mirror-like shine. Everyone has to try it!”&nbsp;” data-reactid=”115″>”We’re also going to see that glow on the eyes, lips, and cheeks,” Tilbury continues. “For a couple of years, matte lips have been huge, but gloss is really making a comeback. I often finish a lip look with a slick of Lip Lustre (£19) or Superstar Lips Glossy Lipstick (£25) on top to add a plumper-looking, sumptuous finish with a gorgeous mirror-like shine. Everyone has to try it!” 

6. Makeup-Skincare Hybrids

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="With so many people becoming more aware (and concerned) about what they're putting on their skin, expect to see a lot of emphasis on skincare-makeup hybrids in 2020—products that offer colour pay-off with good-for-skin ingredients. "There's less attention to colour but more on skincare as part of your makeup routine," Blunder says. "Consumers are more aware of the ingredients and quality of their beauty products. It’s very common for someone to do research ahead of buying or trying anything. For brands, it’s extremely important to note this and only serve clients with the best. Brands like Clé de Peau Beauté do this effectively and reformulate existing products to only incorporate the most sought-after ingredients."&nbsp;” data-reactid=”119″>With so many people becoming more aware (and concerned) about what they’re putting on their skin, expect to see a lot of emphasis on skincare-makeup hybrids in 2020—products that offer colour pay-off with good-for-skin ingredients. “There’s less attention to colour but more on skincare as part of your makeup routine,” Blunder says. “Consumers are more aware of the ingredients and quality of their beauty products. It’s very common for someone to do research ahead of buying or trying anything. For brands, it’s extremely important to note this and only serve clients with the best. Brands like Clé de Peau Beauté do this effectively and reformulate existing products to only incorporate the most sought-after ingredients.” 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Clé de Peau Beauté The Serum (£215)” data-reactid=”127″>Clé de Peau Beauté The Serum (£215)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="She recommends incorporating Clé de Peau Beauté's&nbsp;The Serum&nbsp;(£215) into your routine to encourage radiance sans makeup. It’s formulated with a blend of red, brown, and green kelp to smooth the skin and encourage its natural regenerative processes.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”128″>She recommends incorporating Clé de Peau Beauté’s The Serum (£215) into your routine to encourage radiance sans makeup. It’s formulated with a blend of red, brown, and green kelp to smooth the skin and encourage its natural regenerative processes. 

7. Sheer Makeup

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Now let's talk about coverage because although we've seen&nbsp;a rise in opaque, ultra-matte makeup formulas in recent years, Ta says 2020 is all about light and airy options. From foundation&nbsp;and concealer to blush, highlighter, and beyond, your 2020 mantra should be something along the lines of the lighter, the better. "I think sheer, more natural products are going to be the focus this season," he says. "Less is definitely more for spring 2020."&nbsp;” data-reactid=”132″>Now let’s talk about coverage because although we’ve seen a rise in opaque, ultra-matte makeup formulas in recent years, Ta says 2020 is all about light and airy options. From foundation and concealer to blush, highlighter, and beyond, your 2020 mantra should be something along the lines of the lighter, the better. “I think sheer, more natural products are going to be the focus this season,” he says. “Less is definitely more for spring 2020.” 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Deenihan agrees that natural-looking complexions will be&nbsp;en vogue. "I’m seeing a major return to skin that looks like skin—a&nbsp;cleaner, more realistic complexion," she says.&nbsp;We’re really taking a step back from faux-looking skin that peaked in popularity over the last couple years."&nbsp;” data-reactid=”135″>Deenihan agrees that natural-looking complexions will be en vogue. “I’m seeing a major return to skin that looks like skin—a cleaner, more realistic complexion,” she says. We’re really taking a step back from faux-looking skin that peaked in popularity over the last couple years.” 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Patrick Ta Beauty Monochrome Moment Velvet Blush in She’s Passionate (£28)” data-reactid=”143″>Patrick Ta Beauty Monochrome Moment Velvet Blush in She’s Passionate (£28)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="We'll be channeling this "less is more" approach by using Patrick Ta's Velvet Blush in&nbsp;She’s Passionate&nbsp;(£28), which is a universally flattering shade of&nbsp;rosy pink. Pro tip: After dusting it across your cheekbones, apply it to your eyelids for a cool, monochrome makeup look.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”144″>We’ll be channeling this “less is more” approach by using Patrick Ta’s Velvet Blush in She’s Passionate (£28), which is a universally flattering shade of rosy pink. Pro tip: After dusting it across your cheekbones, apply it to your eyelids for a cool, monochrome makeup look. 

8. Sustainable Beauty

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In 2019, we saw a huge influx of sustainable beauty brands, and we’re here for it. These brands are conscious of their environmental strain, thereby committing to the reduction of unnecessary waste, often housing their products in plastic-free packaging. Some even give back to environmental charities, supporting ocean clean-ups, recycling programs, and other admirable efforts. Deenihan and Ta know that this is more than just a passing trend. As such, they predict sustainability will continue to be a serious topic of discussion in 2020 and beyond.” data-reactid=”148″>In 2019, we saw a huge influx of sustainable beauty brands, and we’re here for it. These brands are conscious of their environmental strain, thereby committing to the reduction of unnecessary waste, often housing their products in plastic-free packaging. Some even give back to environmental charities, supporting ocean clean-ups, recycling programs, and other admirable efforts. Deenihan and Ta know that this is more than just a passing trend. As such, they predict sustainability will continue to be a serious topic of discussion in 2020 and beyond.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""Conscientious product development and sustainable sourcing is becoming non-negotiable in the industry, and I’m happy about it," Deenihan says. "Brands are definitely becoming more aware of the impact they are leaving on the earth and (most!) are doing their best to reduce it. It’s the only way."&nbsp;” data-reactid=”149″>”Conscientious product development and sustainable sourcing is becoming non-negotiable in the industry, and I’m happy about it,” Deenihan says. “Brands are definitely becoming more aware of the impact they are leaving on the earth and (most!) are doing their best to reduce it. It’s the only way.” 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Kosas 10 Second Eyeshadow in Nitrogen (£26)” data-reactid=”157″>Kosas 10 Second Eyeshadow in Nitrogen (£26)

“I am all for green and sustainable beauty,” Ta continues. “It’s been a huge topic at the Patrick Ta Headquarters so look out for a shift from us. But I’m currently loving Honest Beauty and Kosas; they do a really great job at bringing awareness to this global issue, while still keeping their marketing trendy!”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="On that note, we're currently loving Kosas&nbsp;10 Second Eyeshadow&nbsp;(£26). It’s a liquid formula that has an effect&nbsp;like watercolour paint, drying down to create a gorgeous, imperfect finish. Try the blue shade, called Nitrogen, to take part in the aforementioned blue trend.” data-reactid=”159″>On that note, we’re currently loving Kosas 10 Second Eyeshadow (£26). It’s a liquid formula that has an effect like watercolour paint, drying down to create a gorgeous, imperfect finish. Try the blue shade, called Nitrogen, to take part in the aforementioned blue trend.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Honest Beauty Cream Foundation (£25)” data-reactid=”167″>Honest Beauty Cream Foundation (£25)

If it’s Honest Beauty you’re interested in, try the Everything Cream Foundation. I like the fact that you can apply it (and blend it) with your fingers, which comes in handy if you don’t have a brush or sponge nearby, or maybe you’re like me and you just can’t be bothered to get up to grab one.  

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Next up, the biggest&nbsp;S/S 20 fashion trends you need to know.” data-reactid=”169″>Next up, the biggest S/S 20 fashion trends you need to know.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This piece originally appeared on Who What Wear U.S.” data-reactid=”170″>This piece originally appeared on Who What Wear U.S.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This article originally appeared on Who What Wear” data-reactid=”171″>This article originally appeared on Who What Wear

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read More from Who What Wear” data-reactid=”172″>Read More from Who What Wear

Remember dabbing? 

Or bottle flipping? 

So last decade! 


Quick read: A teacher’s guide to TikTok

Quick listen: The truth about mental health in schools

Want to know more? Does speeding up videos, podcasts or reading affect learning?


As we head into 2020, we can expect a load of new trends, many of which will enter our classrooms and affect our teaching and pupils’ learning. 

Here is a round-up of future fads and social movements to look out for so you can score some points on the cool-o-meter and be decidedly down with it.

1. Teens will be even more switched on

When I was growing up, my biggest concern was about Robbie Williams leaving Take That, but today’s teens are much more politically switched on. 

They use social media to keep abreast of current political events and share their opinions confidently, sometimes in the form of hilarious memes. 

In 2019, tens of thousands of school pupils skipped their lessons to attend climate-change strikes in cities across the UK. Experiences in my own classroom in the lead-up to the general election also demonstrated how passionate kids were about vital issues such as Brexit, the NHS and education funding. 

It looks like this is a trend that is set to continue into 2020, and surely this can only be a good thing.

2. TikTok tendency

Millions of teens are already using the app to watch videos, react to them and even film their own responses. The app allows you to record videos up to 60 seconds in length, but most videos last about 15 seconds – short enough to engage even the most distracted of students. 

Teachers have always had to adapt and find new ways of engaging their students so I predict many educators will be looking for new ways to adapt TikTok for use in the classroom.

3. Alternative fashion 

Forget the fake-tanned, ombre-eyebrowed, collagen-lipped Kardashian look – the latest runway looks for spring/summer 2020 are decidedly more alternative, as it seems that subcultures such as goth and punk are making a comeback. 

While it can be hard for students to stamp their own style on a uniform and dress code, expect to see a resurgence of Doc Martens and pin badges on blazers. 

Hopefully, this refocus on individuality may also boost students’ self-esteem, as they will not feel under as much pressure to achieve a perfect Instagram-style look.

4. Gender is just a label

A new wave of gender acceptance is sweeping through schools and the issue is firmly on the agenda. Over the past year, global brands have been aiming to make their products more gender-neutral, and with the popularity of TV shows such as RuPaul’s Drag Race, pupils have never been so woke about gender identity. 

In schools, this raises an important issue about pronouns, as some students feel more comfortable being referred to as “they” and “them” than by the traditional “he” and “she.”

I feel that this is definitely an area in which some staff will need training to ensure that all students feel comfortable. 

Haili Hughes is an English teacher at Saddleworth School in Oldham, Greater Manchester. She tweets @HughesHaili